MENU
Call us on: 0330 088 8408

Social Work in Schools Team

We provide education settings with access to social workers for specialist services.




When would someone not be appropriate for our Social Work in Schools Team?

Our Social Work in Schools Team would not be appropriate for:

  • Dealing with an emergency situation where a child is at significant risk of harm
  • Co-ordinating or replacing the statutory requirements of the local authority

We advise that you contact the local authority or the police with urgent safeguarding concerns.




What is the Social Work in Schools Team?

As our Social Work in Schools Team is made up exclusively of qualified social workers, their experience and knowledge base within education settings achieves the best outcomes for children, young people, families and education settings through planning for the future. Our Social Work in Schools Team helps children and young people to understand their emotions and issues within their life to reduce risk and support the social, emotional and mental health of individuals.


We're registered

EHP is registered with all major professional memberships.




What is social work?

Social work helps individuals, families, groups and communities through building and developing knowledge and skills to have an increased ability to resolve problems. The scope of social work extends past safeguarding and supports people of all ages. Support and advocacy are included in social work to protect people from abuse or neglect, and to enable individuals to live as independently as possible through preparing for adulthood from the earliest age.

Supporting successful preparation for adulthood

With high aspirations, and the right support, the vast majority of children and young people can go on to achieve successful long-term outcomes in adult life. Local authorities, education providers and their partners should work together to help children and young people to realise their ambitions in relation to:

  • higher education and/or employment – including exploring different employment options, such as support for becoming self-employed and help from supported employment agencies
  • independent living – enabling people to have choice and control over their lives and the support they receive, their accommodation and living arrangements, including supported living
  • participating in society – including having friends and supportive relationships, and participating in, and contributing to, the local community
  • being as healthy as possible in adult life

SEND Code of Practice, 2015




Which children and young people does EHP's Social Work in Schools Team work with?

EHP's Social Work in Schools Team often work with children and young people who:

  • Are classed as a "child in need"
  • Have a child protection plan
  • Have looked after status
  • Cause concern
  • Have a disability
  • Have special educational needs

Our social workers have differing backgrounds which means that our Social Work in Schools Team can work with children and young people who do not have any of the above.

Who we work with

Our specialist services can be accessed by education, health and other professions working with children and young people.




What circumstances are children or young people likely to be experiencing that our Social Work in Schools Team work with?

The children and young people our Social Work in Schools Team support can be experiencing many circumstances, challenges and issues. Below are examples of the circumstances children and young people are experiencing, or have experienced which could lead to our involvement:

Circumstances within a child or young person may include:

  • Learning difficulties
  • Communication and language difficulties
  • Being a carer
  • Emotional regulation issues
  • Inappropriate relationships
  • Neglect
    • low school attendance
    • high hunger levels
    • poor hygiene and appearance
  • Self-harm
  • A disability

Circumstances which can impact on social, emotional and mental health occurring within a family can include:

  • Family breakdown
  • Domestic violence
  • Failure to adapt to a child's changing needs
  • Abuse: physical, sexual or emotional
  • Parental criminality
  • Alcoholism
  • Bereavement
  • Parents or carers who:
    • Have additional needs
    • Are in prison
    • Have a history of drug or alcohol abuse
    • Are victims of abuse
    • Are in hospital
    • Are temporarily incapacitated
    • Are absent

Within education settings there are many circumstances happening to children and young people which could impact on social, emotional and mental health, such as:

  • Discrimination
  • Poor pupil-teacher relationships
  • Breakdown of friendships
  • Mate hate and bullying
  • Making and maintaining friends

Our community is diverse which means that circumstances in a child or young person's community could have an impact on social, emotional and mental health, and can include issues which many of us have not experienced before, such as:

  • Homelessness
  • Disaster
  • War
  • Natural disasters
  • Gangs

The above list is not exhaustive, and staff should always be vigilant to changes in behaviour, attitudes and physical appearance with all children and young people.

Some young people will have experienced traumatic events such as abuse, violence, accidents, injuries, asylum seeking or natural disaster. To give an idea of scale, in an average classroom, 10 young people will have witnessed their parents separate, eight will have experienced severe physical violence, sexual abuse or neglect, one will have experienced the death of a parent, and seven will have been bullied.

What works in promoting social and emotional well-being and responding to mental health
problems in schools? 2015




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in education settings?

Our Social Work in Schools Team is made up of registered social workers who work within education settings to support schools in keeping children and young people safe. Our Social Work in Schools Team's role is to reduce safeguarding risks through assessment and input whilst increasing understanding of children and young people's needs within education staff.




How do EHP's Social Work in School Team improve the outcomes of children and young people?

At EHP our Social Work in Schools Team work with education settings and other SEMHS teams to improve the outcomes of children and young people through:

  • Applying specialist safeguarding knowledge
  • Providing specialist mental health services
  • Attending reviews
  • Talking to children and young people in relation to difficult subjects
  • Training education staff, parents and carers
  • Providing workshops
  • Consultancy services
  • Facilitating problem solving
  • Carrying out assessments
  • Providing specialist interventions
  • Delivering group work
  • Signposting to appropriate support
  • Working with parents, carers and families

EHP's Social Work in Schools Team promotes social development and change to empower children, young people and education staff. EHP's SEMHS services provide a broad range of assessments and early interventions which, in some circumstances, negates the need for statutory social work intervention. Providing specialist individual, group and systemic services our Social Work in Schools Team improves the outcomes of children and young people.

Professionals should also be alert to other events that can lead to learning difficulties or wider mental health difficulties, such as bullying or bereavement. Such events will not always lead to children having SEN but it can have an impact on wellbeing and sometimes this can be severe. Schools should ensure they make appropriate provision for a child's short-term needs in order to prevent problems escalating. Where there are long-lasting difficulties schools should consider whether the child might have SEN.

SEND Code of Practice, 2015




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in early years settings?

Positive health and education attainment is facilitated within early years settings due to the opportunities for early needs identification and intervention by our Social Work in Schools Team. Working with early years staff our Social Work in Schools Team maximise early outcomes through providing input with regards to spotting red flags, deciding on levels of need and planning for the future.




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in primary schools?

Our Social Work in Schools Team provides early interventions, parental work and training within primary schools to promote good physical and mental health alongside educational progress. In primary schools our main focus is often on:

  • Nurture groups
  • Raising self-esteem groups
  • Increasing confidence groups
  • Building positive relationships
  • Emotional literacy

Our social workers will decide on the most appropriate intervention according to the individual child and their circumstances. We work with children, carers and education staff.




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in secondary schools?

In secondary schools our Social Work in Schools Team offer a broad range of services for individual and group work, such as:

  • Giving children a space
  • Inclusion groups
  • Nurture groups
  • Taking responsibilities for themselves and their own emotions
  • Groups aimed at increasing self-esteem
  • Groups aimed at raising confidence
  • Counselling
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Understanding and dealing with difficult situations
  • Emotional literacy
  • Building positive relationships
  • Emotional regulation

Providing instant access to our Social Work in Schools Team facilitates early needs identification and swift effective interventions. EHP's Social Work in Schools Team are adaptable to support the needs within your school and reduce risk factors.




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in PRUs?

In PRUs the role of our Social Work in Schools Team often includes increasing understanding in students and staff around the causes of behaviours in addition to specialist support around the regulation of their emotions. As children and young people in PRUs have complex needs, specialist assessments would be used to correctly identify underlying needs. Family work is beneficial as the challenges faced by a child or young person within a PRU could be directly related to a situation within their home environment.




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in SEND schools?

Within a SEND school our Social Work in Schools Team's role will depend on the needs of the students and their parents. Family work within a SEND environment is important due to the extra stresses which can be created by the specialist needs within the family. Our Social Work in Schools Team will also be able to offer all services previously mentioned, although there may be situations when an additional specialist may be required for appropriate adaptation of resources.




What is our Social Work in Schools Team's role in post-16 settings?

Within post-16 settings our Social Work in Schools Team supports individuals in preparing for their future. Preparing for the future can include:

  • Life skills work
  • Assessments for the future
  • Arranging support
  • Taking responsibilities for themselves and their own emotions
  • Understanding and dealing with difficult situations
  • Dealing with anxiety and depression

Post-16 settings are the time to make sure that young people are as prepared as they can be for their future in order to lead a happy, healthy and fulfilled life.



Next steps

  • Step 1.Interested?
  • Step 2.Request more information
  • Step 3.Commission EHP






How do our Social Work in Schools Team determine risk?

In order to reduce risks to children and young people our Social Work in Schools Team determines risk according to the appropriate framework as set out by specific local authorities. For example, for an education setting based within the Manchester local authority our Social Work in Schools Team would determine risk according to the multi-agency need and response framework created by the Manchester Safeguarding Children Board, 2015.




What are the levels of need?

There are five levels of need in relation to safeguarding as defined by the multi-agency need and response framework. Internally, EHP's Social Work in Schools Team use the descriptions of levels of need provided by the Manchester Safeguarding Children Board to maintain a consistent approach. The number of levels vary between local authorities and we will work within the same guidelines as the local authority education settings are located. Each local authority will have a variation of the Manchester descriptions of need in order to categorise the level. Within Manchester the level of need is related to the requirement of specialist services.

Below are examples of the levels of need within Manchester.

Level 1:

Level 1 includes children and young people whose needs are being met, or whose needs can be met, by universal services. Universal services refers to those which are accessible to all, such as the NHS.

Level 2:

Children, young people or families with additional needs that can be met by a single agency providing additional information, support and guidance, or by signposting to an additional agency covers Level 2.

Level 3:

In Level 3, needs become more complex meaning that children, young people or families that need a co-ordinated programme of support from more than one agency.

Level 4:

Level 4 defines children, young people or families who require intensive and co-ordinated support for complex issues and / or where support at Level 3 has not improved outcomes. At Level 4 an individual can be classed as a child in need.

Level 5:

Level 5 defines children or young people at risk of or suffering from significant harm due to compromised parenting, or whose needs require acute services or care away from their home. Individuals at Level 5 are classed as a child in need.

There is not necessarily a gradual escalation through the levels as children and young people can go from being Level 1 to being Level 5 due to an isolated event.




How does our Social Work in Schools Team determine the level of risk?

When determining what level a child or young person is then it is important for our Social Work in Schools Team to fully consider the child, young person, and family experience. Our Social Work in Schools Team ask the following questions to support decisions:

  • Are needs being met?
  • Has the child or young person had an opportunity to speak, be heard and listened to meaningfully?
  • What are the relevant factors at the centre of the child or young person's needs?
  • Is there a picture of the family as a whole?
  • Is the situation understood?
  • Have previous support, external service involvement, risk and protective factors within the family been considered?
  • Has a holistic approach been taken through discussing analysis of identified needs with other professionals who are involved with the child or young person?
  • Have sibling needs been considered?

If you do not know a person available to determine the level of need for a child or young person, then EHP's Social Work in Schools Team can help.




When would it be appropriate for you to refer a child or young person to our Social Work in Schools Team?

At any stage that you have concerns about a child or young person you can refer to us. Through providing education settings with instant access to our Social Work in Schools Team we provide services for children, young people or families:

  • With additional needs
  • With complex need that require a co-ordinated programme of support from multiple professionals
  • Who are classed as 'in need'
  • Who are at risk of, or suffering from, significant harm due to compromised parenting

Wherever possible we like to take a preventative and proactive approach through early needs identification and intervention.

We understand that circumstances and issues around children, young people and safeguarding can be complex which is why we support education settings in confidently handling more issues in house through increasing knowledge around children's services and other support services. Our Social Work in Schools Team provides non-statutory input for all children and young people. We can work with local authorities to complement support for children and young people who are currently receiving statutory social work support. If you would like to learn more about referring a child or young person to our Social Work in Schools Team then please get in touch to talk to a member of our team.

Any professionals with concerns about a child's welfare should make a referral to local authority children's social care. Professionals should follow up their concerns if they are not satisfied with the local authority children's social care response.

Working together to safeguard children, 2015




What is a child in need as defined by the Children Act, 1989?

Section 17 of the Children Act (1989) states that a child in need requires significant specialist provision and support in order to maintain or achieve an acceptable level of development or health. A child or young person with a disability may also be classed as a child in need. Usually child in need status follows multiple concerns from school or an alternative setting around low school attendance, high hunger levels, poor hygiene and appearance.

The aim is to use all the information to identify difficulties and risk factors as well as developing a picture of strengths and protective factors.

Working together to safeguard children, 2015

When an individual reaches child in need status then the local authority have a responsibility to assess and provide services. The number of levels may vary between local authorities, but section 17 criteria will remain the same.

Section 17 - Child in need:

Some children in need will be well supported and have their needs met by their families without the requirement for Social Work intervention. Other children in need will have more acute needs and will require social work support.

Our Social Work in Schools Team can screen and escalate cases where the threshold for Section 17 assessment and intervention is met and a child or young person requires local authority statutory social work involvement.




What assessments can our Social Work in Schools Team deliver?

Our Social Work in Schools Team deliver a broad range of assessments as part of their role. Assessments provide information regarding personal beliefs about themselves, attachment needs and individual strengths. Specific social work assessments include:

  • Level of need
  • Level of risk
  • Needs
  • Strengths
  • Resilience
  • Family

Our Social Work in Schools Team are experienced and knowledgeable enabling them to use the results from assessments to make appropriate recommendations.

Every assessment should be focused on outcomes, deciding which services and support to provide to deliver improved welfare for the child.

Working together to safeguard children, 2015




What interventions can our Social Work in Schools Team deliver?

Our Social Work in Schools Team can deliver many interventions, specifically in relation to social, emotional and mental health. An example of interventions include:

  • Life story work
  • Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) based interventions
  • Emotional literacy
  • Understanding difficult emotions
  • Emotional regulation
  • Inclusion groups

Interventions are chosen based on identified needs. If you are unsure of which intervention would be required then please get in touch to find out more in terms of the interventions our Social Work in Schools Team can provide.




What do our Social Work in Schools Team do for the whole school?

Our Social Work in Schools Team can support your school in implementing or adapting systemic approaches towards safeguarding, family work and social, emotional and mental health. Our Social Work in Schools Team also provides training on topics which are relevant to your school.




What training can our Social Work in Schools Team deliver?

Our Social Work in Schools Team have packages of set training and workshops:

  • Webster-Stratton
  • Attachment
  • Skills for difficult work with children
  • Safeguarding
  • Behaviour management
  • Identity
  • Inclusiveness
  • Supporting troubled families
  • Understanding and dealing with difficult situations
  • Spotting red flags

All training will be made relevant to your setting, and it is possible to design bespoke training specifically for the needs present within your education setting. Some training and workshop sessions are recommended for parents and carers.

Training

Our training is available on and off site for education settings and organisations in relation to health, psychology and education.

... all staff members should receive regular safeguarding and child protection updates (for example, via email, e-bulletins, staff meetings) as required, but at least annually, to provide them with relevant skills and knowledge to safeguard children effectively.

Governing bodies and proprietors should recognise the expertise staff build by undertaking safeguarding training and managing safeguarding concerns on a daily basis. Opportunity should therefore be provided for staff to contribute to and shape safeguarding arrangements and child protection policy.

Keeping children safe in education, 2016




Why use EHP's Social Work in Schools Team?

EHP's Social Work in Schools Team is a cost effective service which offers schools:

  • Immediate access to specialist knowledge and services
  • Immediate response to needs
  • Bespoke packages of support
  • Flexible and adaptable support
  • The provision of parental services, including workshops
  • The improvement of social, emotional and mental health
  • The provision of a unique onsite social worker service which keeps you informed
  • Quick referrals within our multidisciplinary specialist team
  • Bespoke training relevant to your needs
  • Specialist assessment and intervention packages
  • A professional team with experience of Children's services and CAMHS

Our Social Work in Schools Team brings many benefits to schools, including:

  • Improved social, emotional and mental health within students
  • Increased confidence among staff to support more safeguarding concerns internally
  • Early interventions to maximise children and young people's potential
  • Improved relationships with parents and carers
  • Increased understanding of children and young people's needs and requirements

Having immediate access to our Social Work in Schools Team ensures that you receive a swift service which can keep you included during the process so you are not left in the dark about how best to support an individual.




Who can refer to our Social Work in Schools Team?

We usually recommend that the designated safeguarding officer, or safeguarding lead make the referral to our Social Work in Schools Team as they will have complete access to the relevant information we may need to know. SENCOs and members of the senior leadership team can also make referrals.

Funding

Our services can be funded through a variety of ways.

EHP's Social Work in Schools Team is a specialist service based within your education setting to provide maximum impact. If you require additional information about our Social Work in Schools Team then please get in touch to talk to a member of our team.




Which professionals do our Social Work in Schools Team work with?

As EHP's Social Work in Schools Team have a varied role within education and health, they work with many professionals, including:

  • Psychologists
  • Teaching staff
  • Child and adolescent mental health workers
  • Doctors
  • Nurses
  • Probation staff
  • Solicitors
  • Local authorities
  • Police
  • Therapists

EHP's social work team works alongside each specialist within our multidisciplinary team, to provide comprehensive support packages to education settings.

Do our Social Work in Schools Team provide services for children with looked after and adopted status?

Yes, our Social Work in Schools Team provide a broad range of specialist services for children with looked after and adopted status. Supporting children with looked after and adopted status is one part of being a social worker and this experience leads to a broad understanding of needs. Read more about our specific Looked After Team and Adoption Team.

[Find out more/get in touch nugget #2]

Commission EHP

Our specialist multidisciplinary services can be commissioned through a service level agreement and as standalone input.




Get in touch

If you would like to find out more about the services we offer or to book a free initial discussion then please contact us not on 0330 088 8408 or email office@ehp.org.uk

Find out more



Is this page helpful?   Yes   No